How Does Vehicle Ownership Affect a Car Accident Case?

It is not uncommon for people to borrow another person’s car. Some workers frequently drive other people’s cars as part of their job responsibilities. Unfortunately, car accidents are just as common.

In each of these cases, the person who owns the car is an important detail in identifying liability and determining how damages will be paid for. A vehicle’s ownership will often determine whose insurance company covers collision-related expenses and if additional legal action is necessary.

If You Are Injured in Someone Else’s Car

When you are driving someone else’s car and are injured in a collision, it is possible that either that person’s insurance company or the other driver’s provider will cover the damages. Your own insurance company may be able to provide funds as well, if you have a personal injury coverage policy. However, it is possible that the vehicle’s owner may be able to sue you for additional damages.

If Someone Else is Injured in Your Car

Allowing another person to borrow your car, only to discover they were involved in an accident, is an extremely frustrating experience. People who find themselves in this situation often wonder if they are responsible for paying for the damages simply because they own the car.

In at-fault car insurance states, the insurance provider of whoever caused the accident is responsible for paying the damages. New York is a no-fault state, so every resident’s insurance policy covers themselves and their own car. If the person who drove your car is named on your insurance policy, your coverage should pay for the damages. If the person who drove your car is not named on your insurance policy, they will most likely be excluded from coverage and will be responsible for covering their medical bills and the damages to your vehicle. Their own insurance may provide coverage, depending on their policy.

Company Vehicles and Work-Related Accidents

As part of your job responsibilities, you may have to use a company vehicle. In some roles — such as a valet driver or mechanic — you may be required to drive other people’s cars. If you are injured while doing either of these things, who is liable?

While driving a company vehicle, your workers’ compensation benefits may come into play. If you qualify for workers’ compensation, you may not even have to question who is liable because your employer’s insurance should cover the damages.

If you are driving a customer’s car as part of your work, workers’ compensation benefits could still apply to cover your injuries. However, they may not cover the damages, and the owner of the vehicle may choose to pursue additional legal action. The results of an accident, in this case, will depend on your employer’s auto insurance policy and the terms of their agreement with the customer.

If you were injured in a car accident, contact Foley Griffin, LLP. We can help you understand the complexities of your collision case, negotiate with insurance companies, and pursue the compensation you deserve.

To schedule a free consultation with our attorneys, send us a message or call (888) 966-8480.

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